Sex Influences Brain Aging by Impacting DNA Methylation
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

Sex Influences Brain Aging by Impacting DNA Methylation

While sex differences across aging and in the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases are well documented, relatively little data is available that compares sex-specific epigentic changes in the aging brain.1  Recent studies have identified specific loci with age-realted hyper- or hypo- methylation changes in liver, lung, and heart – but no …

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DNA methylation is as active mark of aging and age-related cognitive impairment in the medial prefrontal cortex
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

DNA Methylation is as Active Mark of Aging and Cognitive Impairment

Aging and age-related cognitive decline have been reported to be associated to transcriptomic alterations related to neural activity, synaptic plasticity and inflammation in specific brain regions, including the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC).1-4  Furthermore, previous epigenetic studies indicate that DNA methylation in the hippocampus is linked to cognitive …

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Estrogen, Memory, & Aging
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

Estrogen, Memory, & Aging: DNA methylation of the ERα promoter contributes to transcriptional differences in age across the hippocampus

Lara Ianov1,2, Ashok Kumar1, Thomas C. Foster1,2  1Department of Neuroscience, McKnight Brain Institute, 2Genetics and Genomics Program, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 Estradiol (E2) influences a number of processes that are important for maintaining healthy brain function, including memory. The ability of E2 to protect the brain …

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DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in the aging brain
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in the aging brain – Not less, but where

Changes in DNA methylation have long been an area of interest for neurobiology of aging researchers.  With the recent reports of ‘aging’ DNA methylation clocks1,2 and the discovery of roles for methylation3 and hydroxymethylation4 in memory formation5 there is a heightened interest in examining changes in DNA modifications with aging …

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Epigenetic-metabolic axis in aging
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseHistone Modifications

Midlife crisis? Exploring the metabolic-epigenetic axis in “early” aging

Aging is characterized by a gradual and overall deterioration of our body’s function. The risk to suffer from maladies such as cancer, dementia, loss of muscles and others is greatly increased with the progression of aging. A substantial scientific effort and funding is channeled towards the understanding of molecular mechanisms …

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epigenetic processes underlying AD in 5XFAD mouse
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Epigenetic mechanisms are a driving force in familial Alzheimer’s disease

With the increasing of life expectancy, aging and age-related cognitive impairments are becoming one of the most important issues for human health. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the major cause of dementia in the elderly. Along with cognitive impairment and memory loss, Alzheimer’s is also …

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Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and HydroxymethylationHistone ModificationsRegulatory RNA

Epigenetics, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

Roy Lardenoije, Daniël van den Hove, and Bart Rutten Epigenetics is a booming, but highly complex and rapidly evolving field. Apart from the well-studied regulatory mechanisms involving DNA and histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs, there are the more recent additions of RNA methylation and editing, and reports of epigenetic regulation …

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Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

Epigenetic drift versus the Epigenetic clock: distinct relationships between DNA methylation and aging

Commentary written by Meaghan Jones and Sarah Goodman Your genome is defined at conception, and aside from rare mutations, it is relatively fixed over your lifetime. Your epigenome, on the other hand, is a balance of responsiveness and heritability. The epigenome can change with specific exposures or experiences, and has …

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