Frog Eyes Might Be Key to Retinal Regeneration
Chromatin StructureDevelopmental Biology & Stem CellsDNA Methylation and HydroxymethylationHistone Modifications

Frog Eyes Might Be the Key to Retinal Regeneration

Often said to be the windows to the soul, our eyes are one of the main ways we perceive the world around us. Vision loss, whether due to aging or injury, can be devastating and often hinders the ability to work, leading to economic stress [1]. Current treatments for vision …

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Beneficial Effect of Exercise on DNA Methylation
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

The Beneficial Effect of Exercise on DNA Methylation

As difficult as it may be to drag ourselves out of bed in the morning to go for a run or fit in a quick trip to the gym after work, regular exercise is essential for a healthy life. Research has shown that regular physical exercise reduces the risk of …

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How Jet Lag Impacts Epigenetics
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseDNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

Up All Night and Asleep All Day: How Jet Lag Impacts Epigenetics

Anyone who has ever dragged themselves off of a red-eye flight, understands the exhaustion of jet lag. Depending on how far you’ve traveled, the effects of jet lag can last from days to weeks, leading to sleepless nights and tired days as your body attempts to reset its circadian clock. …

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C. elegans Histone Methyltransferase Targets Regions to Silence
Developmental Biology & Stem CellsHistone Modifications

How a C. elegans Histone Methyltransferase Targets Regions to Silence

As an organism grows and develops, its cells are rapidly dividing and committing to different fates. Some, for example, will become immune cells, while others will become skin cells. What decides the different fates of these cells is how their genes are expressed. For example, to become a skin cell, …

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Altering Heterochromatin Disguises Malaria from Host
Chromatin StructureHistone Modifications

Hidden in Plain Sight: How Altering Heterochromatin Disguises Malaria from its Host

Like a criminal adopting a disguise to evade detection, malaria parasites inside red blood cells express specific proteins on the blood cell surface to hide from the immune system. When the malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum, are eventually detected, they simply switch the identity of the surface protein in a process …

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Epigenetic Link to Recurrent Miscarriage
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseChromatin StructureDevelopmental Biology & Stem Cells

An Epigenetic Link to Recurrent Miscarriage

Miscarriage, or natural loss of a pregnancy, is a common reproductive problem and can be upsetting for families trying to have a child. Recurrent miscarriage (RM) – two or more miscarriages – often occur because of problems that arise very early in embryonic development. A common cause of RM is …

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MicroRNAs Take Down Brain Cancer
Aging, Environment, & DiseaseRegulatory RNA

MicroRNAs Team Up to Take Down Brain Cancer

MicroRNAs are small but powerful molecules in the cell. Containing only around 22 nucleotides, these small RNA molecules are responsible for binding to and silencing messenger RNA sequences before they can be translated into proteins, and thus are incredibly important regulators of gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRs) often regulate the expression …

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Losing Heterochromatin to Determine Cell Fate
Chromatin StructureDevelopmental Biology & Stem Cells

Losing Heterochromatin to Determine Cell Fate

In the moments after fertilization, the tiny mass that is the embryo sets in motion developmental programs that will transform it into a human being. One of the earliest steps in human development is the formation of the germ layers. Humans and other animals in the Chordata phylum, have three …

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